Kevin Magnussen is potentially one more incident away from a Formula 1 race ban after a series of controversial moves on track by the Haas driver during the Miami GP weekend.

Race stewards in Miami imposed five penalty points on Magnussen’s superlicence during the course of the event in Florida – doubling his current total to 10.

Drivers face an automatic one-race suspension if they accrue 12 penalty points across a rolling 12-month period.

Problematically for Magnussen, all 10 of his exciting points have been earned in the first six races of this season, which began March.

He gained the first three of his points for a collision with Williams’ Alex Albon at the Saudi Arabian GP on March 9.

Those three points will not expire until March 9 next year – the week before the start of the 2025 season.

How Magnussen has accrued his 10 points

Race Date Incident Penalty points
Saudi Arabian GP March 9 Collision with Albon 3
Chinese GP April 21 Collision with Tsunoda 2
Miami Sprint May 4 Repeatedly leaving track 3
Miami GP May 5 Collision with Sargeant 2

To avoid a ban, Magnussen therefore needs to make sure he does not pick up two penalty points in the 18 races that remain of the 2024 campaign. The 31-year-old is hoping to retain his seat at Haas for next season.

No driver has reached the 12-point limit to trigger the automatic ban since the system was introduced in 2014.

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Watch the restart chaos as both RB drivers Yuki Tsunoda and Daniel Ricciardo are forced to retire at the Chinese Grand Prix

How Magnussen’s miserable Miami played out

Magnussen found himself in hot water with stewards in both the 19-lap Sprint and the main Grand Prix at the wall-lined Miami International Autodrome.

On Saturday, he was handed three penalty points for repeatedly leaving the track and gaining an advantage while trying to defend from Lewis Hamilton in order to prevent the Mercedes from chasing down team-mate Nico Hulkenberg, running seventh, ahead.

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Lewis Hamilton loses a place to Yuki Tsunoda after Kevin Magnussen goes off the track to defend his position

In a frank admission after the Sprint to Sky Sports F1, Magnussen said: “All the penalties were well deserved – no doubt about it. But I had to play the [team] game again.

“I started using these stupid tactics which I don’t like doing, but at the end of the day I did my job as a team player and Nico scored his points because I got that gap for him so Lewis and Tsunoda couldn’t catch him.

“Not the way I like to go racing at all, but it was what I had to do.”

Magnussen later faced the stewards on a charge of alleged unsportsmanlike behaviour, but Hamilton was relaxed about the incidents, saying: “That’s what you do to work as a team, so bravo.”

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Haas’ Kevin Magnussen says he did his job as a team player after creating a gap for team-mate Nico Hulkenberg, which cost him three penalties during the Miami Sprint

On Sunday, Magnussen was then found to be “wholly to blame” for the collision with Logan Sargeant at Turn Three which sent the Williams in to the barriers and caused the lap-29 Safety Car.

Stewards imposed a 10-second time penalty on Magnussen in addition to two further superlicence points.

He was eventually classified 19th and last in the grand prix with 20s added to his final race time after another rules transgression, this time by the team, when they incorrectly pitted him under the Safety Car for repairs to his front wing.

“It wasn’t a good day, again,” admitted Magnussen.

“Hopefully I can get some clarity on things going forward. What happened today, of course it’s not good, but nonetheless, we try to move on and have a better weekend next weekend.”

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